twitter
facebook
facebook

The Creation of an EU Financial Regulatory Framework

Wednesday, 11 January 2012 12:46

A new and essential course that explains the EU regulatory revolution for finance professionals at all levels


Why you need this course

The EU has been pushed into a journey to a new world of financial regulation and it is clear that EU finance professionals will be working within an overarching regulatory framework that is run at EU level.  A large part of the EU shares a single currency which is forcing its users into an ever-closer union. But there is a second driving force towards regulatory change: the global financial crash and the corresponding global response co-ordinated at G20 level. Accordingly, users of the euro will see a much closer degree of financial regulatory integration to be a natural part and parcel of that political closeness.

 

A massive review of almost every aspect of regulation is underway – with more to come in the retail area and a second wave in the field of capital markets. As the full consequences of the crisis are considered, professionals in many fields (banking, securities, law, accountancy, asset management, insurance, etc.) may need targeted help to keep up with the pace and breadth of these changes.

 

Senior managers need to understand the political linkages that are driving fundamental reform horizontally across many different business sectors as failure to recognise then early may put their firms at a competitive disadvantage. As an example, the Commission’s retail agenda has not yet reached the popular press but the combination of SEPA with PRIPS, IMDII and MiFIDII is designed to give a level playing field across retail savings products from firms in securities, asset management and insurance. Moreover, that playing field is intended to be cross-border.

 

A newcomer to the industry will need an understanding of the origins of the pressures that have driven the current legislative patchwork into existence. Once the shape of the tree is understood, then the intricacies of the design of a particular branch will become relevant and comprehensible.

 

Course overview

Developed by economist and leading EU regulation expert Graham Bishop, The Creation of an EU Financial Regulatory Framework forms a Foundation Course for anyone who needs to understand the EU's journey into the new world of financial regulation. It consists of four online lectures, and accompanying course material, that may be undertaken as individual modules or as a complete course. Each lecture is split into three or four subsections so that each can be viewed independently and a professional can supplement their knowledge in any specific area they need. The complete course is designed to help all students of financial regulation in the European Union, whether embarking on a career, or part-way through. But it will enable a newcomer to the financial services industry to be well versed in the background to the EU's Single Currency, Single Market and Financial Regulation.

 

If required, there is a five question, multiple-choice exam at the end of each complete lecture, on successful completion, a pass certificate can be printed out for CPD purposes. An increasing number of professional bodies accept our course and webinars for Continuing Professional Development (CPD) purposes.

 

Lecture 1: Milestones in European Monetary Integration: 1945 – 2011 (includes a copy of the book 'The EU Fiscal Crisis: Forcing Eurozone Political Union in 2011) - more information on this book here
Lecture 2: The Politics of EU Financial Services Regulatory Architecture
Lecture 3: The Global Financial Crisis of 2007 and Onwards: The Global and EU Responses (includes a copy of the book 'EU Financal Regulation: Key Events 2010/2011) - more on this book here
Lecture 4: The 2010 regulatory reform package – implications

 

Download the full course synopsis here

 

Each Lecture is priced at €150+ VAT/£124+ VAT/$190, or €550+ VAT/£454 + VAT/$699 for the complete course. On payment you will be sent full instructions on how to access the material.

Lecture 1: Milestones in European Monetary Integration: 1945 – 2011

EU FR Framework Lecture 1 £148.80 Add to Cart
 

Lecture 2: The Politics of EU Financial Services Regulatory Architecture

EU FR Framework Lecture 2 £148.80 Add to Cart

Lecture 3: The Global Financial Crisis of 2007 and Onwards: The Global and EU Responses

EU FR Framework Lecture 3 £148.80 Add to Cart

Lecture 4: The 2010 regulatory reform package – implications

EU FR Framework Lecture 4 £148.80 Add to Cart

Complete course: Save €50/£40/$60

EU FR Framework complete course £544.80 Add to Cart

Sterling and Euro prices include VAT which is chargeable in the UK and the EU. If VAT is not applicable, the amount will be deducted at checkout.Euro and dollar prices are illustrative and will be calculated using current exchange rates at checkout.

 

Contents


Lecture 1: Milestones in European Monetary Integration: 1945 – 2011

Part 1: Origins and objectives of the EU
1945 End of World War II
1946 Churchill In Zurich
1950 Schuman Declaration
1955 Messina Declaration
1957 Treaty of Rome
1986 Single European Act

Part 2: Creation of the single currency
1970 Werner Plan
Problems of the ERM
1989 The Delors Report
1991 Treaty of Maastricht
1999/02 Introduction of single currency

Part 3: Achievements relevant to financial services
1992 The single market - the "1992" programme
1999 FSAP - 1999 update of the single market

Part 4: Economic Governance
1979/2011 Development of the European Parliament
The Community method versus inter-governmentalism
2007 Treaty of Lisbon: Council and Parliament as co-legislators
2010 May: Effective decision for "political union"
2011 December: the International Agreement

 

Lecture 2: The Politics of EU Financial Services Regulatory Architecture    
Part 1: SEM and Financial Services
The single market : '1992' programme
FSAP - 1998 update of the Single Market

Part 2: Driving the FSAP reforms forward
Commissioner Monti 1995-1999
Commissioner Bolkestein 1999-2004
Commissioner McCreevy 2004-2010
Commissioner Barnier 2010-2014

Part 3: Lamfalussy Process: financial integration = political integration
The Wise Men's mandate
The "four level" process
CESR, CEBS, CEIOPS
Parliament and Council co-decision
Lisbon Treaty

Part 4: Current financial regulation architecture - the 2010 package
De Larosière Group report
Key regulatory powers to European level
ESMA, EBA, EIOPA

 

Lecture 3: The Global Financial Crisis of 2007 and Onwards: The Global and EU Responses

Part 1: The Rise of the G20
Washington -2008
London - 2009
Pittsburgh - 2009
Toronto - 2010
Seoul - 2010
Cannes - 2011

Part 2: Globalisation of Financial Regulation
BIS
BCBS
IOSCO
IASB
IAIS
CPSS
FSB

Part 3: EU Responses (as at Autumn 2011)
Commission response to G20
Key Events - 2010/11
AIFMD
CRA
CRD III
EMIR

 

Lecture 4: The 2010 regulatory reform package – implications

Part 1: Powers
Council and Parliament
Commission
The Meroni Judgement and Comitology
Authorities

Part 2: Regulations and Directives
What is a Directive?
What is a Regulation?
The original request to Lamfalussy
Transposition problems of Directives
Solution: more Regulations

Part 3: Current financial regulation architecture - the 2010 package
De Larosière Group report
Key regulatory powers to European level
ESMA, EBA, EIOPA

Part 4: Impact on national regulations e.g. UK
Primacy of EU-level legislation
National regulators freedom to act
Role of FSA


About Graham Bishop


GrahamBishop.com was founded in July 2000 to bring our clients the direct insights that flow from Graham’s position as a leading technical analyst of economic and structural developments in the financial markets of Europe.


GrahamBishop.com is engaged with the key participants in this rapidly changing environment: Investors, issuers (government and private), politicians, officials, central bankers, providers of the market infrastructure, academics, the media and other interested parties. Our contacts span the EU: at the European level, they include the Parliament, Commission and Central Bank as well as representative bodies and think tanks. In many Member States, contacts cover the same breadth of participants. Our aim is to bring our members into contact with others in these groups and, especially, the opinions that flow from participants with such different perspectives.

 

The proximity to the policy formation process stems from Graham’s standing with the European Commission, the European Central Bank and European Parliament. This enables us to interpret economic and political developments with authority and insight. Moreover, we have close links with many think tanks in London and Brussels and the Brussels for Breakfast meetings in many EU financial centres give a particular insight into the interaction of market participants and regulators around the EU.

 

Search

// Wibiya toolbar